Articles (not peer-reviewed) [231]

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Forthcoming
Rechtssicherheit oder Einzelfallgerechtigkeit im neuen Recht des Delistings
Archiv für die civilistische Praxis
forthcoming
The International Court of Justice and the Judicial Politics of Identifying Customary International Law
European Journal of International Law
28
forthcoming
Abstract
It is often observed in the literature on customary international law that the identification practice of the International Court of Justice for customary norms deviates from the traditional definition of customary law in Art. 38 (1) lit. b of the ICJ Statute. However, while there are many normative and descriptive accounts on customary law and the Court’s practice, few studies try to explain the jurisprudence of the ICJ. This study aims at closing this gap. I argue that the ICJ’s argumentation pattern is due to the institutional constraints that the Court faces. In order for its decisions to be accepted, it has to signal impartiality through its reasoning. However, the analysis of state practice necessarily entails the selection of particular instances of practice, which could tarnish the image of an impartial court. In contrast, if the Court resorts to the consent of the parties or widely accepted international documents, it signals impartiality.
2017
Italiens Banken – Die Probleme werden verschleppt
Wirtschaftswoche online
2017
2016
A Random Shock Is Not Random Assignment
Economics Letters
145
45-47
2016
Choosing and Not Choosing with and without Communication: Comment
Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics
172
158-162
2016
Comparing the effectiveness of collusion devices in first-price procurement: An auction experiment
Evolutionary and Institutional Economics Review
2016
Darwinian Adverse Selection
Algorithmic Finance
5
31-36
2016
Die EZB-Krisenpolitik nach dem OMT-Urteil des Bundesverfassungsgerichts
Juristenzeitung
71
21
1045-1049
2016
Experience and Gender Effects in Acquisition Experiment with Value Messages
Small Business Economics
2016
Multinational investigation of cross-societal cooperation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
113
39
10836-10841
2016
Abstract
In a globalized world, establishing successful cooperation between people from different nations is becoming increasingly important. We present results from a comprehensive investigation of cross-societal cooperation in one-shot prisoner’s dilemmas involving population-representative samples from six countries and identify crucial facilitators of and obstacles to cooperation. In interactions involving mutual knowledge about only the other players’ nationalities, we demonstrate that people hold strong and transnationally shared expectations (i.e., stereotypes) concerning the cooperation level of interaction partners from other countries. These expectations are the strongest determinants of participant cooperation. Paradoxically, however, they turn out to be incorrect stereotypes that even correlate negatively with reality. In addition to erroneous expectations, participants’ cooperation behavior is driven by (shared) social preferences that vary according to the interaction partner’s nationality. In the cross-societal context, these social preferences are influenced by differences in wealth and ingroup favoritism, as well as effects of specific country combinations but not by spatial distance between nations.