Search results for: Author=Fiedler [21]

Pages

Forthcoming
Neuroeconomics
Handbook of Eyetracking
Wiley
New York
forthcoming
2018
Belastbare und effiziente Wissenschaft: Strategische Ausrichtung von Forschungsprozessen als Weg aus der Replikationskrise
Psychologische Rundschau
69
22-36
2018
Cross-national in-group favoritism in prosocial behavior: Evidence from Latin and North America
Judgment and Decision Making
13
1
42-60
2018
The influence of episodic memory decline on value-based choice
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
2018
2017
2016
Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices: A Simple, Low-Cost, Effective Method for Increasing Transparency
PLoS Biology
14
5
2016
Abstract
Beginning January 2014, Psychological Science gave authors the opportunity to signal open data and materials if they qualified for badges that accompanied published articles. Before badges, less than 3% of Psychological Science articles reported open data. After badges, 23% reported open data, with an accelerating trend; 39% reported open data in the first half of 2015, an increase of more than an order of magnitude from baseline. There was no change over time in the low rates of data sharing among comparison journals. Moreover, reporting openness does not guarantee openness. When badges were earned, reportedly available data were more likely to be actually available, correct, usable, and complete than when badges were not earned. Open materials also increased to a weaker degree, and there was more variability among comparison journals. Badges are simple, effective signals to promote open practices and improve preservation of data and materials by using independent repositories.
How Reproducible Are Restults from Empirical Psychology?
2016
Abstract
To maintain confidence in scientific findings, the project presented in this video by SUSANN FIEDLER examines the reproducibility rate of empirical results in psychology: Studies published in three major psychological journals in 2008 are replicated by other researchers in collaboration with the original authors. The results of original and replicated studies are compared to determine the general reproducibility rate in psychological science as well as the factors that predict it.
“I can see it in your eyes”: Biased Processing and Increased Arousal in Dishonest Responses
Journal of Behavioral Decision Making
29
2/3
322-335
2016
Abstract
According to self-maintenance theory, people notice their dishonest acts and thus experience ethical dissonance between their misconduct and their positive moral self. In this view, dishonesty is facilitated by justifications that redefine moral boundaries. By contrast, the bounded ethicality approach suggests that biased perception prevents people from becoming aware of their dishonesty. We tested the key process assumptions behind these accounts using pupillary responses and fixation data and found physiological evidence for both kinds of mechanisms. In particular, physiological arousal increased at the initial stage of cheating responses. This suggests that people are on some level aware of their wrongdoings. At the same time, however, we found attentional biases that can reduce the likelihood for detecting potentially disadvantageous information. We suggest that dishonest acts come at the internal cost of increased tension, which people aim to avoid by pre-emptive biased processing as well as post hoc justifications.
The reversed description-experience gap: Disentangling sources of presentation format effects in risky choice
Journal of Experimental Psychology: General
145
4
486-508
2016
2015
Attention and Moral Behavior
Current Opinion in Psychology
6
139-144
2015