Search results for: Author=Sutter [173]

Pages

Forthcoming
Endogenous role assignment and team performance
International Economic Review
forthcoming
Trust and Communication in a Property Rights Dilemma
Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization
forthcoming
2018
Evaluating intergenerational persistence of economic preferences: A large scale experiment with families in Bangladesh
2018/04
Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods
Bonn
2018
Abstract
Economic preferences – like time, risk and social preferences – have been shown to be very influential for real-life outcomes, such as educational achievements, labor market outcomes, or health status. We contribute to the recent literature that has examined how and when economic preferences are formed, putting particular emphasis on the role of intergenerational transmission of economic preferences within families. Our paper is the first to run incentivized experiments with fathers and mothers and their children by drawing on a unique dataset of 1,999 members of Bangladeshi families, including 911 children, aged 6-17 years, and 544 pairs of mothers and fathers. We find a large degree of intergenerational persistence as the economic preferences of mothers and fathers are significantly positively related to their children’s economic preferences. Importantly, we find that socio-economic status of a family has no explanatory power as soon as we control for parents’ economic preferences. A series of robustness checks deals with the role of older siblings, the similarity of parental preferences, and the average preferences within a child’s village.
Social preferences in childhood and adolescence. A large-scale experiment to estimate primary and secondary motivations
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
146
16-30
2018
2017
Die Entdeckung der Geduld. Ausdauer schlägt Talent. (in Turkish: Sabrın Keşfi – Yetenek Karşısında Sebatın Zaferi)
Kaknus
2017
Gender differences in discrimination emerge early in life: Evidence from primary school children in a bilingual city
Economics Letters
152
15-18
2017
How social preferences shape incentives in (experimental) markets for credence goods
Economic Journal
127
393-416
2017
How uncertainty and ambiguity in tournaments affect gender differences in competitive behavior
2017/18
Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods
Bonn
2017
Abstract
Tournament incentives prevail in labor markets, in particular with respect to promotions. Yet, it is often unclear to competitors how many winners there will be or how many applicants compete in the tournament. While it is hard to measure how this uncertainty affects work performance and willingness to compete in the field, it can be studied in a controlled lab experiment. We present a novel experiment where subjects can compete against each other, but where the number of winners is either uncertain (i.e., unknown numbers of winners, but known probabilities) or ambiguous (unknown probabilities for different numbers of winners). We compare these two conditions with a control treatment with a known number of winners. We find that ambiguity induces a significant increase in performance of men, while we observe no change for women. Both men and women increase their willingness to enter competition with uncertainty and ambiguity, but men react slightly more than women. Overall, both effects contribute to men winning the tournament significantly more often than women under uncertainty and ambiguity. Hence, previous experiments on gender differences in competition may have measured a lower bound of differences between men and women.
Market versus Residence Principle: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of a Financial Transaction Tax
The Economic Journal
127
F610-F631
2017
Measuring Indirect Effects of Unfair Employer Behavior on Worker Productivity – A Field Experiment
2017/22
Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods
Bonn
2017
Abstract
We present a field experiment in which we set up a call-center to study how the productivity of workers is affected if managers treat their co-workers in an unfair way. This question cannot be studied in long-lived organizations since workers may change their career expectations (and hence effort) when managers behave unfairly towards co-workers. In order to rule out such confounds and to measure productivity changes of unaffected workers in a clean way, we create an environment where employees work for two shifts. In one treatment, we lay off parts of the workforce before the second shift. Compared to two different control treatments, we find that, in the layoff treatment, the productivity of the remaining, unaffected workers drops by 12 percent. We show that this result is not driven by peer effects or altered beliefs about the job or the managers’ competence, but rather related to the workers’ perception of unfair behavior of employers towards co-workers. The latter interpretation is confirmed in a survey among professional HR managers. We also show that the effect of unfair behavior on the productivity of unaffected workers is close to the upper bound of the direct effects of wage cuts on the productivity of affected workers. This suggests that the price of an employer’s unfair behavior goes well beyond the potential tit-for-tat of directly affected workers.