Current Challenges in Market Design

  • Date: Jan 15, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Axel Ockenfels
  • University of Cologne
  • Location: MPI

Fairness in Machine Decision Making

  • Date: Jan 29, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Krishna Gummadi
  • Max Planck Institute for Software Systems
  • Location: MPI
Machine (data-driven learning-based) decision making is increasingly being used to assist or replace human decision making in a variety of domains ranging from banking (rating user credit) and recruiting (ranking applicants) to judiciary (profiling criminals) and journalism (recommending news-stories). Recently concerns have been raised about the potential for discrimination and unfairness in such machine decisions. Against this background, in this talk, I will pose and attempt to answer the following high-level questions: (a) How do machines learn to make discriminatory or unfair decisions? (b) How can we quantify unfairness in machine decision making? (c) How can we control machine unfairness? i.e., can we design learning mechanisms that avoid unfair decision making? (d) Is there a cost to fair decision making? [more]

On Experimental Legal Philosophy

  • Date: Feb 19, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Stefan Magen
  • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
  • Location: MPI
We investigate subnational disparities in preliminary reference activity by locating national courts on maps of the EU territory. Spatial visualization reveals that involvement in the preliminary ruling procedure tends to be concentrated in a relatively small subset of regions within member states. Using a machine learning approach, we explore a wide range of possible predictors and the relations among them. Our data-driven analysis shows that regions that are the seat of a peak court and have a large cargo port are associated with higher referral rates. So too are regions that are the seat of the country's capital and regions exhibiting greater economic dynamism. Our ndings directly inform the theoretical discussion and suggest ways to reconcile varying strands of research on trade, courts, litigation and institutional change in the EU context. [more]

The inefficiency of efficient breach: Contract renegotiation under asymmetric Information

  • Date: Mar 19, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Andreas Engert
  • University of Mannheim
  • Location: MPI
Revisiting the longstanding debate about contract remedies and "efficient breach," we study experimentally whether expectation damages or specific performance better promote renegotiation of the contract when it matters-when the seller cannot be sure whether performing his obligation is efficient. We hypothesize that giving the buyer a right to specific performance enables her to disclose more private information about her valuation of the good, facilitating agreement between the parties. We test the hypothesis in a first experiment with one-sided asymmetric information: the seller's cost of performance is commonly known but the buyer's valuation is private information. The experimental design aims at insulating the incentive effect, stripping away the contractual context to neutralize the players' normative preconceptions. The results lend some support to the advantages of specific performance. They also suggest that those advantages will become more prominent under two-sided asymmetric information, which we intend to test in a second experiment. [more]

Revealed Privacy Preferences: Are Privacy Choices Rational? (with Yi-Shan Lee)

  • Date: Apr 4, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Roberto Weber
  • University of Zurich
  • Location: MPI
The development of effective privacy policies rests critically on the question of whether people are capable of engaging in rational tradeoffs regarding the use of their personal information. This study investigates the extent to which people's decisions in this domain exhibit consistency with an underlying rational preference for privacy. We develop a novel experiment in which people allocate privacy levels between different personal information items, allowing us to classify people depending on whether their choices are consistent with the Generalized Axiom of Revealed Preference. We find 63 percent of subjects act consistently with a rational preference ordering when allocating privacy levels, despite the substantial heterogeneity of privacy attitudes. We further investigate the extent to which these revealed privacy preferences can be measured by monetary equivalents and whether preferences elicited over choices in our experiment have any predictive power for explaining real-world privacy behavior. We find that the classification of rationality from choices is also predictive of monetary tradeoffs: irrational types, on average, squander 260 percent more money than rational types through inconsistencies in their monetary valuations. Despite the presence of noise, monetary valuations nevertheless capture some of the underlying privacy preferences, as more private types require significantly more compensation for sharing personal data. Finally, the measures of privacy preferences elicited in the laboratory are correlated with a widely-used question eliciting self-reported privacy concerns and with behavioral outcomes in real-world domains of personal information sharing. We conclude that, despite the fact that we study choices in a fairly simple decision environment, there is considerable heterogeneity in rationality that should be considered when designing future privacy policies. [more]

The Competitive Woman (joint work with Y. Jane Zhang)

  • Date: Apr 17, 2018
  • Time: 14:30
  • Speaker: Alessandra Cassar
  • University of San Francisco
  • Location: MPI
A large body of experimental evidence suggests that women have a lower desire to compete than men. Here, we advance the hypothesis that this gap may depend on how we elicit such preferences, as different incentives could activate competition in different spheres, depending on culture. This hypothesis is tested through a series of experiments using vouchers (in-kind restricted use of cash) in China, Colombia, Bosnia and Togo. Data on parents show that, once the incentives are switched from monetary to child-benefitting, gender differences disappear; data on young adult without children show that once cash is substituted by gender stereotypical vouchers (make-up or sporting good vouchers) gender differences decrease. Cultural elements in each society matter, as not all societies exhibit a gender gap. As expected, competitiveness is higher where resources are more scares, as among the displaced women in Colombia and the women in polygyny arrangements in Togo. These results suggest that female competitiveness can be just as intense as male competitiveness, given the right goals and considering the differential constraints that societies put on women and men, indicating important implications for policies designed to promote gender equality. [more]

Learning from realized versus unrealized prices

  • Date: Apr 25, 2018
  • Time: 10:00
  • Speaker: Georg Weizsäcker
  • Humboldt University Berlin
  • Location: MPI

A meritocratic origin of egalitarian behavior

The Just World at Work: Theory and a Natural Field Experiment

  • Date: May 15, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: James Konow
  • University of Kiel
  • Location: MPI
Two rules have figured prominently in both the descriptive and prescriptive literatures on distributive justice, viz., equality and equity. The former refers to equal shares, whereas the latter refers to allocations that are in proportion to some variable, such as hours worked or effort. We consider the possibility that worker experience with equal or equitable compensation schemes affects their beliefs about which rule applies. We formulate a simple model of fairness preferences that incorporates the claim of the Just World Hypothesis that people are motivated to rationalize their actual rewards, that is, to adjust their beliefs about what is fair in the direction of their actual allocations. A theory is formulated in conjunction with a natural field experiment in which Ethiopian workers complete a piecemeal task over a two week period. The theory predicts that high and low productivity workers, whose beliefs are affected by their actual pay, will respond in their work effort to changes in compensation schemes depending on whether they have initially been paid equally or equitably. The results of the experiment on worker effort are consistent with the changes predicted by the theory. [more]
Self-regulation abilities are known to be a central determinant of educational success and a wide range of other important life outcomes. We conducted a randomized-controlled trial with about 600 first graders to identify the causal effect of a targeted self-regulation training on self-regulation abilities, concentration, and educational outcomes. Results demonstrate that our self-regulation training increases long-term outcomes 12 months after treatment for attention and inhibition abilities, self-regulation behavior, as well as reading abilities. There is no treatment effect on math abilities, fluid IQ, and on one of our concentration tasks. We conclude that targeted training of self-control abilities in early years can substantially improve these self-regulation abilities in the long run, that these improvements potentially serve as a multiplier for the promotion of schooling abilities, and thus that this kind of training might be an effective tool to foster the skill formation process. [more]

The Impact of Peer Personality on Academic Achievement

  • Date: Jun 5, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Bart Golsteyn
  • Maastricht University
  • Location: MPI

Moral Values and Voting

  • Date: Jul 4, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Benjamin Enke
  • Harvard University
  • Location: MPI

How lotteries in school choice help leveling the playing field

  • Date: Jul 4, 2018
  • Time: 18:30
  • Speaker: Dorothea Kübler
  • Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung (WZB)
  • Location: MPI

Money is more than memory

  • Date: Jul 20, 2018
  • Time: 10:00
  • Speaker: Maria Bigoni
  • University of Bologna
  • Location: MPI

What Do Employee Referral Programs Do?

What Do Employee Referral Programs Do?
  • Date: Sep 27, 2018
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Matthias Heinz
  • University of Cologne
  • Location: MPI
In an RCT covering all grocery store jobs at a European grocery chain, 238 stores were randomized to give information to employees or pay them different bonuses for making referrals. Larger bonuses increase referrals and decrease referral quality, though the increase in referrals is fairly modest. Still, the employee referral programs (ERPs) are highly profitable. This reflects in part that referred workers are substantially more likely to stay than non-referrals, but primarily that non-referrals have higher retention in stores treated with ERPs relative to control stores. The firm rolled out an ERP across the entire firm and increased bonuses. In the post-RCT rollout, referral rates remain low for grocery jobs, but are high for non-grocery jobs, which are perceived as much more attractive. Our results (1) are consistent with a model where referrals are driven by both monetary incentives and altruism toward friends and (2) show that ERPs can have substantial benefits beyond the people who are referred. [more]

Motives in Economic Interactions: An (interactive) eye-tracking study

Motives in Economic Interactions: An (interactive) eye-tracking study
  • Date: Oct 10, 2018
  • Time: 14:00
  • Speaker: Jan Hausfeld
  • University of Konstanz
  • Location: MPI
When people make choices, their gaze patterns can reveal the motives underlying the decision process, because they spend more time on items particularly relevant for these motives. We investigate how untrained people use gaze patterns to uncover the motives behind others' decisions. We display recorded or real-time gaze patterns of one subject to another, and let the latter subject infer the former's prosociality. While the recorded gaze patterns provide strategically undisturbed information, the real-time gaze patterns require taking the strategic component of the interaction into account. When gazing is non-strategic, observers can recognize the more prosocial or generous decision makers. In contrast, when gaze is transmitted real-time, the eye-tracked decision makers successfully alter their gaze to appear more prosocial. [more]

Safe Spaces for Women: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Sierra Leone During the Ebola Epidemic

  • Date: Oct 10, 2018
  • Time: 16:15
  • Speaker: Imran Rasul
  • University College London
  • Location: MPI
The condition of women in developing countries is characterized by low economic empowerment and limited agency over their body. This paper evaluates a policy intervention aimed at relaxing these constraints for adolescent girls in Sierra Leone, a setting in which women experience high levels of sexual violence and face numerous other economic disadvantages. The intervention provides young women with a safe space (a club) where they can find support, access vocational training and information on reproductive health. Unexpectedly, the post-baseline period coincided with the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the most severe ever recorded. Compounding the epidemic's health costs, the closure of all schools and mobility restrictions resulted in acute disruptions to socioeconomic life. Our analysis leverages the cross-village variation in severity of village-level disruptions and random assignment of villages to the intervention to document the impact of the Ebola outbreak on 4700 women tracked in 200 villages, and the ameliorating role played by the intervention. In control villages, over the crisis, women spend significantly more time with men, out-of-wedlock pregnancy rates rise, and those exposed to severe Ebola-related disruption have a 16pp drop in school enrolment post-crisis. These adverse effects are significantly reversed in treated villages. The intervention thus fosters a range of basic skills, as well as entrepreneurial skills and health knowledge gained from intervention clubs. The results show how policy interventions can be effective even in times of aggregate shocks, and highlights the lack of safe spaces in low-empowerment contexts such as Sierra Leone, is a key channel through which an aggregate crisis damages the economic lives of young women. [more]

The Rule of Law and Voluntary Cooperation: Experimental Evidence from 43 Societies

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  • Date: Oct 17, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Simon Gächter
  • School of Economics, University of Nottingham
  • Location: MPI

Ethical free-riding: When honest people find dishonest partners

  • Date: Oct 22, 2018
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Shaul Shalvi
  • University of Amsterdam
  • Location: MPI
Corruption is often the product of coordinated rule-violations. We investigate how such corrupt collaboration emerges and spreads when people can choose their partners (vs. not). Participants were assigned a partner and could increase their payoff by coordinated lying. After several interactions, they were either free to choose whether to stay or switch partners, or forced to stay with (or switch) their partner. Results reveal both dishonest and honest people exploit the freedom to choose a partner. Dishonest people seek and find a partner that will also lie—a “partner in crime.” Honest people, by contrast, engage in ethical free-riding: they refrain from lying but also from leaving dishonest partners, taking advantage of their partners’ lies. We conclude that to curb collaborative corruption, relying on people’s honesty is insufficient. Encouraging honest individuals not to engage in ethical free-riding is essential. [more]

Parochial Altruism: Measurement Issues

  • Date: Oct 24, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Robert Böhm
  • RWTH Aachen University
  • Location: MPI

Advancing Evolutionary and Cultural Perspectives on Interdependence and Cooperation

  • Date: Nov 19, 2018
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Daniel Balliet
  • University of Amsterdam
  • Location: MPI

Dispelling misconceived beliefs: the case of rent control

  • Date: Nov 21, 2018
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Jordi Brandts
  • Barcelona Graduate School of Economics
  • Location: MPI

Methods of complexity reduction and their effects in social, economic, and computational environments

  • Date: Nov 26, 2018
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Jürgen Jost
  • Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig
  • Location: MPI

CREED Workshop

  • Date: Nov 28, 2018
  • Location: MPI

Civic Honesty Around the Globe

Who should benefit from affirmative action? Ability, effort and discrimination as justifications for quota rules

The ICTY Experiment: A Triple-Use Study on Legal Reasoning

  • Date: Dec 17, 2018
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Holger Spamann
  • Harvard Law School
  • Location: MPI

Guilty Minds and Biased Minds

  • Date: Jan 21, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Markus Kneer
  • University of Zurich (UZH)
  • Location: MPI

Determinants and malleability of truth-telling preferences

  • Date: Jan 23, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Johannes Abeler
  • University of Oxford
  • Location: MPI

Prosociality: Hard to build but easy to destroy (with Michela Tincani)

  • Date: Jan 30, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Fabian Kosse
  • LMU Munich & briq
  • Location: MPI

Delegation and team selection

  • Date: Feb 4, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: John Hamman
  • Florida State University
  • Location: MPI

Power, Knowledge and Justice: Experiments on Distributive Decisions in Networks

  • Date: Feb 11, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Bernhard Kittel
  • University of Kiel
  • Location: MPI
17240 1550657404

The Value of an Attorney: Evidence from Changes to the Collateral Source Rule

  • Date: Feb 18, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Eric Helland
  • Claremont McKenna College
  • Location: MPI
17241 1551271994

Substituting Invalid Contract Terms: Theory and Empirics (with Ori Katz)

  • Date: Feb 25, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Eyal Zamir
  • Center for Empirical Studies of Decision Making and the Law, University of Jerusalem
  • Location: MPI

Das Öffentliche Recht und die Kunst der Prognose

Get Real! Individuals Prefer More Sustainable Investments

  • Date: Apr 2, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Paul Smeets
  • Maastricht University
  • Location: MPI

Noise, Cognitive Function, and Worker Productivity

  • Date: Apr 2, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Joshua Dean
  • briq Institute
  • Location: MPI
15628 1559042523

Inequality and moral behavior

  • Date: Apr 3, 2019
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Stefan Trautmann
  • University of Heidelberg
  • Location: MPI

Workshop

  • Date: Apr 4, 2019
  • Location: MPI

Cognitive Skills and Economic Preferences in the Fund Industry

  • Date: Apr 10, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Michael Kirchler
  • Universität Innsbruck
  • Location: MPI

Should Humans be Users or Slaves of AI? An Experiment on the Future of Work

  • Date: May 6, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Wolfgang Ketter
  • University of Cologne
  • Location: MPI
15631 1559042256

Scapegoating: Experimental Evidence

  • Date: May 8, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Michal Bauer
  • CERGE-EI
  • Location: MPI

Regulating hybrid intelligence

  • Date: May 13, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Gerrit Hornung
  • University of Kassel
  • Location: MPI
17631 1559042015

How do adults handle distributive conflicts among children? Experimental evidence from China and Norway

  • Date: May 22, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Alexander Cappelen
  • NHH Norwegian School of Economics
  • Location: MPI
18906 1559568020

Workshop on Experimental Comparative Law

  • Start: May 23, 2019
  • End: May 24, 2019
  • Location: MPI
18846 1559041362

Using Corpus Linguistics in Legal Research

  • Date: May 27, 2019
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Karen McAuliffe
  • University of Birmingham Law School
  • Location: MPI

Using Genetic Data to Estimate Causal Influences in the Obesity-SES Relationship

The Future of IT-Security: Usability, Empiricism and AI

  • Date: May 27, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Matthew Smith
  • University of Bonn, Computer Science
  • Location: MPI

What can we learn about the homo sapiens from computer games?

  • Date: Jun 3, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Stefan Thurner
  • Medical University of Vienna
  • Location: MPI

Experimental Finance Workshop

  • Date: Jun 4, 2019
  • Time: 09:00
  • Location: MPI

Patience, Accumulation, and Comparative Development

  • Date: Jun 5, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Uwe Sunde
  • LMU
  • Location: MPI

Three is more than two in more ways then one

  • Date: Jul 1, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Ilja van Beest
  • Tilburg University
  • Location: MPI
17629 1570012972

Psychology and Behavioral Economics of Poverty

19149 1570013011

Ownership, Learning and Beliefs

  • Date: Jul 11, 2019
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Alex Imas
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • Location: MPI

Die EU „Whistleblower“-Richtlinie

  • Date: Jul 17, 2019
  • Time: 10:00
  • Speaker: Michael Wiedmann
  • Norton Rose Fulbright LLP
  • Location: MPI

If you could read my mind – An Experimental Beauty-Contest Game with Children (with Daniel Schunk)

  • Date: Sep 26, 2019
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Henning Hermes
  • NHH Norwegian School of Economics
  • Location: MPI

Promoting Best Practices in a Multitask Workplace: Experimental Evidence on Checklists

  • Date: Sep 26, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Henry Schneider
  • Queens University at Kingston
  • Location: MPI

Deconstructing Group Bias: Social Preferences and Groupy vs. Non-Groupy Behavior

  • Date: Oct 2, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Rachel Kranton
  • Duke University
  • Location: MPI

The potential of virtual reality to study criminal and unethical behavior

The role of social sciences in the application of law

  • Date: Oct 14, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Thomas Möllers
  • University of Augsburg
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Oct 28, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Norbert Paulo
  • University of Salzburg
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Nov 11, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Alon Harel
  • Hebrew University Jerusalem
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Nov 13, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Ingvild Almas
  • Stockholm School of Economics
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Nov 20, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Sule Alan
  • EUI
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Nov 27, 2019
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Tim Cason
  • Purdue
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Nov 27, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Klaus Schmidt
  • LMU Munich
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Dec 2, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Peter Krebs
  • University of Siegen
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Dec 4, 2019
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Seda Ertac
  • Koc University
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Dec 4, 2019
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Nava Ashraf
  • LSE London School of Economics
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Dec 9, 2019
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: Peter Richerson
  • University of California Davis
  • Location: MPI

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Workshop briq / IZA / MPI

  • Date: Dec 19, 2019
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Jan 8, 2020
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Helga Fehr-Duda
  • Universität Zürich
  • Location: MPI

What does brain science tell us about free will?

  • Date: Jan 13, 2020
  • Time: 16:00
  • Speaker: John Haynes
  • Charité Berlin
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Feb 5, 2020
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Daniele Nosenzo
  • University of Nottingham
  • Location: MPI

Gary Charness Conference

  • Date: Mar 25, 2020
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Apr 22, 2020
  • Time: 11:00
  • Speaker: Ori Weisel
  • Tel Aviv University
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Apr 22, 2020
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Jonathan de Quidt
  • Stockholm School of Economics
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: Apr 29, 2020
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Sebastian Ebert
  • Frankfurt School of Finance
  • Location: MPI

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  • Date: May 6, 2020
  • Time: 17:00
  • Speaker: Matteo Galizzi
  • London School of Economics
  • Location: MPI

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EWEBE Workshop & Selten Lecture

  • Date: Jun 25, 2020
  • Location: MPI
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